With the rising crime rates in the TCI we can really utilise qualified professionals in the Criminal Justice field. Whether you would like to be a Police Officer, Criminologist, Cyber Crime Specialist – there is an avenue for you.

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Academic Routes

Technical Routes

Academic Routes

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Further Education

Higher Education

What do I need?

What you need depends on the chosen job in the Criminal Justice sector. To find out the various jobs available under Criminal Justice we got you covered here.

You can become a police officer from both academic and non-academic backgrounds. Recruitment and selection procedures are managed (using a nationally-agreed, competency-based framework) by police forces at a local level. The recruitment process will normally include the following steps:

  • submission of an application form
  • a selection assessment day and interview/s
  • a medical assessment and fitness test
  • reference and security checks. Prospects

Due to improvements in the Policing sector, to stand out and gain more promotions, obtaining an undergraduate or postgraduate degree is becoming vital. Degrees in subjects like Criminal Justice, Criminology, Cyber Crime or Policing would catapult you to higher heights.

How to Stand Out

According to Prospects, working with individuals or groups in the community, such as sports coaching or working with local youth groups would also help put you in a greater position. Joining the Cadets would be beneficial.

Further Education

Jump to:

A-Levels

BTEC Diploma

Access to Higher Education

Further Education is considered Level 3 education in England, Northern Ireland and Wales. The most common further education route is A-Levels but it’s not the only option. There are coursework based courses like BTEC. To pursue a Bachelors degree you must complete this stage first.

A-Levels

A-Levels are exam based courses. You can take from 3 A-Level subjects as most university courses require at least 3. For Criminal Justice related degree courses, most universities do not require any specific A-Level subjects.

Since universities are not looking for specific entry subjects, you have to assess your main interest and sectors you want to work in. This is mainly so you enjoy what you are studying and you are establishing a solid knowledge base. If your end goal is Criminology, A-Levels in Social Sciences (Sociology, Psychology etc.) would suffice. If you wish to work in the cyber field an A-Level IT or Computing related subjects would be well suited.

While A-Levels are a ticket to a university degree, it does not certify employment in Criminal Justice. Training on the job or pursuit of a degree in the relevant discipline does.

What qualifications do I need? A-level courses will usually require at least 5 IGCSEs (A*-C)/CSECs (Grades 1-3) . Mathematics and English Language passes are mandatory to possess as well. It is best to check the specific requirements of the university you intend to go to as the entry requirements may differ.

Click here to find A-Level courses.

BTEC Diploma

The process of obtaining this qualification is more practical in comparison to the more theory based academic A-Level. You are assessed solely with coursework.

These qualifications are available at different levels and depending on this, the diploma can be equivalent to up to three (3) A-Levels. BTECs can be taken alongside other qualifications (such as an A-Level) and can permit entry to university.

Because universities are not looking for specific subjects [as it pertains to Criminal Justice courses] you have to assess your main interest and sectors you want to work in. This is mainly so you enjoy what you are studying and you are establishing a solid knowledge base. If your end goal is Criminology, a BTEC diploma in Social Sciences would suffice. If you wish to work in the cyber field a BTEC diploma in IT or Computing related would be well suited.

What qualifications do I need? It depends on the BTEC diploma you’re pursuing. Level 3 BTEC diplomas will usually require at least 5 IGCSEs (A*-C)/CSECs (Grades 1-3). Mathematics and English Language passes are mandatory to possess as well. It is best to check the specific requirements of the university you intend to go to as the entry requirements may differ.

Click here to find BTEC courses.

But what if I’m over 18 and I have no Level 3 qualifications? We got you below.

Access to Higher Education

Access to Higher Education aka Access to HE, is tailored for students aged 19+ who intend to apply for an undergraduate course. These courses take only one year, performing as a fast track to higher education.

Because universities are not looking for specific subjects you have to assess your main interest and sectors you want to work in. This is mainly so you enjoy what you are studying and you are establishing a solid knowledge base. Access to Higher Education courses in Social Sciences, Computer Science etc. are among good options for subjects related to Criminal Justice.

What qualifications do I need? Access to HE diplomas will usually require at least 5 IGCSEs (A*-C)/CSECs (Grades 1-3). Mathematics and English Language passes are customarily mandatory to possess as well. It is best to check the specific requirements of the school you intend to go to as the entry requirements may differ.

Click here Access to HE courses.

Higher Education

All applications to undergraduate courses are done via UCAS. Criminal Justice undergraduate courses can done in foundation degrees, HND or Bachelors level. Criminal Justice course often come combined with Criminology and/or Policing. If you are unsure which sector you want to work in, Combined Honours courses are better suited you.

Searching Criminal Justice courses on UCAS throws a wealthy bunch of universities for you to choose from.

With the copious choices given, it may make it difficult to decipher which is best for you.

To start narrowing it down, we suggest you first look at the entry requirements to the course and assess your existing or prospective exam/coursework results.

Next, have a look at the modules done by the university and assess if those are relevant to your career if you’ve already chosen. Also view the teaching quality at the university.

Finally, use comparative websites like Discover Uni or the Complete University Guide to compare course satisfaction and other statistics to make informed decisions.

As previously mentioned Criminal Justice is often offered in combination with Policing, Law or Criminology. For instance, the University of Kent offers Criminal Justice with Criminology. Kingston University offers a slightly unique course in Human Rights and Social Justice with the option of a placement year.

To view all options and courses, enter your area of study and search courses here.

What qualifications do I need? It varies per university but largely universities require at least 112 tariff points. Grades in A-Level tend to be at least BBC. BTEC diploma grades required tend to be at least DMM. Check the entry requirements per course on UCAS. Some courses have foundation entry options which allows you to gain the qualification and continue the course with lower entry requirements.

Foundation courses can also be taken if your results/points accumulated in a Level 3 qualification were not high enough to allow entry to a standard three-year Bachelors course.

Enter your area of study and search Foundation degrees here. In the filters select Foundation to only view Foundation courses.

Technical Routes

Police Officers

Police do not need formal graduate qualifications and most training is done on the job. However the Policing sector is changing and requirements are beginning to rise as it pertains to promotions.

You could also volunteer to gain valuable experience, such as with the Volunteer Police Cadets. The Metropolitan Police has its own specific site for London volunteers; see Metropolitan Police Volunteer Police Cadets. You can also volunteer to be a police community support officer (PCSO) or a special constable, often referred to as a Special. – Prospects

Recruitment and selection procedures are managed (using a nationally-agreed, competency-based framework) by police forces at a local level. The recruitment process will normally include the following steps:

  • submission of an application form
  • a selection assessment day and interview/s
  • a medical assessment and fitness test
  • reference and security checks. Prospects

Most other jobs within the Criminal Justice sector require formal qualifications. Do not be discouraged, it possible to pursue this from this route. See above for how to achieve this. To learn more about what Criminal Justice actually is and jobs involved in the industry are click here.

To find out what immigration hurdles you must pass to pursue education in the UK click here. For financial 411s click here.

Want apply for university in the UK? Click here.

Posted by:Nandina Hislop

Editor-in-Chief | Instagram: @nandinahislop

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